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sasquatch
02-11-2018, 06:35 PM
I like to make my own survival kits, especially out of stuff I already have. Like Altoid tins.
These are just some of what I've put together, I'd love to see what ideas you have, so post em' up.


This is my standard Altoids tin survival kit. These are great to throw in your pocket, keep in a bag, or your vehicle.
Many of the contents came from stuff I already had. The rest can be found at sporting goods stores, Amazon, or the camping section at Wal-Mart.

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Contents:
1. Fishing kit (Hooks, sinkers, splitshot, 25yds of 8lb test line, snap swivels.
2. Ferro rod with striker fire starter.
3. Aqua-Tabs. For water purification.
4. Minimalist folding knife.
5. Band-Aids (various sizes)
6. Chicken bouillon powder, salt, pepper.
7. Paraffin wax/cotton balls (For fire starting)
8. Small compass.
9. Wire saw.
10. Safety pins.
11. Strike anywhere storm matches.
12. Sewing kit.

Pack the contents into the tin, then seal with waterproof tape. Wrap 550 cord around the tin.
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sasquatch
02-11-2018, 06:46 PM
This next project is a long burning candle.



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Cut strips of corrugated cardboard, thin enough to fit into the tin bottom and still be able to close the lid. Coil the cardboard strips into the tin as tightly as possible.
Melt paraffin wax and pour it onto the cardboard in the tin. It will absorb quite a bit, so you'll have to wait until it's done, and possibly pour more wax in.
When the wax starts to pool on top, stop pouring, make sure the top of the card board is still exposed.

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Pull up the end of the cardboard in the center and light it.
It will act as a wick and burn the wax just like a candle.

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sasquatch
02-11-2018, 07:00 PM
Ok. Let's make a mini-survival stove.



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You'll need to have a small bottle for your fuel since it will evaporate if left in the stove. I use Iso-Heet, but +90% alcohol, lighter fluid, and other clear, lightweight, flammable fluids will work.

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Just place this stove under a grill or between two rocks to place pots or pans above it for cooking and boiling water.

Stay tuned for more survival products you can make at home.

sasquatch
02-11-2018, 08:13 PM
Here's another alcohol stove that I have made before.



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When the fuel has been brought to the proper temperature, place a penny, or other piece of non-flammable material over the center hole. Of course if you are going to set a pot or metal cup directly onto the stove, the penny or center hole cover won't be necessary. That can be tricky to do though, so I usually place the stove between two rocks, then place my container of choice on the rocks.

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To extinguish, cover with a pot or cup. I have been able to blow it out, but I wouldn't recommend it as the flames could flare up and burn your face.

It's a good idea to have a small, secure, bottle for your fuel as any fuel left in the stove will eventually evaporate.
I carry this stove in a zip-loc bag, just be sure to let it complete cool down after use before stowing it.

I have tested this stove thoroughly, and it burns really hot, please be careful when using this stove. Once lit, DO NOT attempt to move it or touch it!
It will boil water in a little more than a minute.
I've used it in a black out to cook on also.

77 wolfpack
02-12-2018, 02:38 AM
With the amount of fuel you use, how long will they burn? Also, what is the life span of one of these kinds of emergency stoves in a survival/camping setting? What fuels burn the shortest/longest?

sasquatch
02-12-2018, 02:54 AM
It all depends on the type of fuel you use. I use enough to fully saturate the cotton.
I have used Iso-Heet fuel treatment, 97% rubbing alcohol, Coleman fuel, and lighter fluid.
The Iso-Heet will burn, I'd say, 30-45 minutes.
The rubbing alcohol ignites quickly but burns faster, clean burn of 15-20 minutes.
Coleman fuel burns really well and hot, decently clean. Probably get an hour or more out of it.
Lighter fluid will burn as long as the Coleman fuel, but will leave residue, it's not very clean burning.

Iso-Heet is my #1 choice though.

sasquatch
02-12-2018, 03:45 PM
These are what I like to call "Fire Pods". Because it just sounds cool.
Easy to ignite and hot enough to burn damp or wet fuel.
They're great to keep around for normal fire starting or for any bug out bags and survival kits.
These suckers are fire starting gold. Easy to make also.
Let's get started.


Safety first. You'll probably want to wear some work gloves and eye protection, hot wax isn't pleasant when it splashes on exposed skin or eyes. A set of food tongs is also needed to avoid contact with hot wax.


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Now you have a waterproof fire starter that can easily be ignited with one match or concentrated sparks from a ferro rod.

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These things burn hot and long enough to dry and ignite wet fuel.

sasquatch
02-12-2018, 05:14 PM
Sasquatch's Ultimate Fire Tinder: When it absolutely, positively, HAS TO BURN !

I've experimented extensively with survival fire starting materials.
I took a few of my favorites and combined them.
These babies will burn for 8-10 minutes and depending on contents and size, longer.
Easy to make, throw em in a zip-loc bag and add them to your survival kit or bug out bag.


First you'll want to gather some crystallized pine sap.

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Ignites easily with a match. I've also had good results using a ferro rod with magnesium shavings.
Works best if you pinch a small piece and pull out some cotton fibers to ignite.

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Starts out with a small flame.

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Once the petroleum jelly and pine sap ignite you'll have a large, extremely hot, long burning flame. Suitable for starting the most stubborn of wet or damp fuel.

Survival_junkie
02-13-2018, 11:50 AM
I've never tried this with pine sap but can only imagine how much better it would be. If you fluff it back out, with the wax removed from the catch area, these will catch sparks off a flint or firesteel like nobodies business. Pretty much any incarnation of these works, I've even used hand sanitizer before but it burns too fast. How long does it last in this version? Here's what I've found in the past:

Cotton ball, plain: medium flame, burn time approximately 25 seconds
Cotton with Hand Sanitizer: medium to large flame, burns hotter and last approximately 45 seconds
Cotton with Petroleum Jelly: small to medium flame at first growing gradually to medium to large, burns hotter than plain cotton but not as hot as alcohol, lasts significantly longer at about 2 to 3 minutes

sasquatch
02-13-2018, 03:36 PM
I've never tried this with pine sap but can only imagine how much better it would be. If you fluff it back out, with the wax removed from the catch area, these will catch sparks off a flint or firesteel like nobodies business. Pretty much any incarnation of these works, I've even used hand sanitizer before but it burns too fast. How long does it last in this version? Here's what I've found in the past:

Cotton ball, plain: medium flame, burn time approximately 25 seconds
Cotton with Hand Sanitizer: medium to large flame, burns hotter and last approximately 45 seconds
Cotton with Petroleum Jelly: small to medium flame at first growing gradually to medium to large, burns hotter than plain cotton but not as hot as alcohol, lasts significantly longer at about 2 to 3 minutes


Thanks for the reminder, I forgot about pulling out some of the cotton to catch a flame better.
I freaking love hand sanitizer, so many survival uses.
I've watched this particular version burn for 10 minutes or more. The one I made for this tutorial burned for 11 minutes.
The cotton tends to char and create shell around the melted pine sap, so if you poke it with something it will expose the pine sap and burn longer.
The pine sap is the key and it depends how big you make the ball and how many pieces of pine sap crystal.

Survival_junkie
02-13-2018, 05:31 PM
Thanks for the reminder, I forgot about pulling out some of the cotton to catch a flame better.
I freaking love hand sanitizer, so many survival uses.
I've watched this particular version burn for 10 minutes or more. The one I made for this tutorial burned for 11 minutes.
The cotton tends to char and create shell around the melted pine sap, so if you poke it with something it will expose the pine sap and burn longer.
The pine sap is the key and it depends how big you make the ball and how many pieces of pine sap crystal.

That's awesome. If you can't get your fire started in 11 minutes you're probably not going to at all. That's long enough to cook or purify water with in most cases. I'm wondering if birch bark can improve this any...

Survival_junkie
02-13-2018, 05:34 PM
By the way, I've never heard of anyone using ISO Heet in a penny stove before, learn something new everyday.

sasquatch
02-13-2018, 05:58 PM
That's awesome. If you can't get your fire started in 11 minutes you're probably not going to at all. That's long enough to cook or purify water with in most cases. I'm wondering if birch bark can improve this any...


Oh yeah. The only problem is the pine sap. While it may smell good, it gives off a kinda black smoke and residue. That's minor though if you really need to start a fire in a survival situation.
It's worth a try, papery birch bark burns great.

sasquatch
02-13-2018, 06:09 PM
By the way, I've never eard of anyone using ISO Heet in a penny stove before, learn something new everyday.


Iso-Heet (red bottle, not yellow) is a very good fuel for alcohol stoves, it's basically 99% isopropyl alcohol with water removing molecules added to it.

Survival_junkie
02-13-2018, 09:10 PM
Oh yeah. The only problem is the pine sap. While it may smell good, it gives off a kinda black smoke and residue. That's minor though if you really need to start a fire in a survival situation.
It's worth a try, papery birch bark burns great.

They say in a survival situation, no matter what you are currently doing, you never pass on a chance to collect good fire tinder or pitch. The nice thing about pitch, in addition to fire making, is it can also be used as a glue/patch substance; and while I haven't personally tried it, I've heard it's a good additive to soups and stews, along with the cambium layer.

sasquatch
02-13-2018, 09:44 PM
They say in a survival situation, no matter what you are currently doing, you never pass on a chance to collect good fire tinder or pitch. The nice thing about pitch, in addition to fire making, is it can also be used as a glue/patch substance; and while I haven't personally tried it, I've heard it's a good additive to soups and stews, along with the cambium layer.


Absolutely. Pine sap is great. Aside from being great for fire starting, it makes a great sealant for water proofing. Boiled pine tar pitch is what they used on old sailing ships to make them watertight.
It has anti-bacterial properties also. That's basically what turpentine is, pine sap mixed with mineral spirits.
It can be diluted into a liquid or tincture to treat wounds, sore muscles, and joint pain.

Pine cambium is extremely high in vitamin C, so are pine needles, you can steep them in boiling water to make tea.

Survival_junkie
02-13-2018, 10:28 PM
Absolutely. Pine sap is great. Aside from being great for fire starting, it makes a great sealant for water proofing. Boiled pine tar pitch is what they used on old sailing ships to make them watertight.
It has anti-bacterial properties also. That's basically what turpentine is, pine sap mixed with mineral spirits.
It can be diluted into a liquid or tincture to treat wounds, sore muscles, and joint pain.

Pine cambium is extremely high in vitamin C, so are pine needles, you can steep them in boiling water to make tea.

Yeah, I've always heard it makes a good tea but have never tried it. Haven't really been in a situation to yet. I don't know how true it is but I've heard one cup of Pine tea can have more vitamins than 3 or 4 oranges.

sasquatch
02-16-2018, 06:58 PM
Survival usages for common drinking straws.
Don't throw away those used fast food straws, they make handy containers that can be used to hold and protect any number of useful items.
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Use a drinking straw to store matches away from moisture.
Cut straw to length.
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Seal one end of the straw using a pair of pliers and a lighter.
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Insert matches with the heads toward the already sealed end, then seal open end.
Glue a striker to the straw and it's ready to go into a survival kit.
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Use a straw to store fire tinder.

You'll need a piece of straw, petroleum jelly, and cotton.
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Once again, start by sealing one end of the straw.
Saturate cotton with petroleum jelly, then roll and twist it into the straw.
Use something to pack it down to make room to seal the other end.
Seal open end.
To use, simply cut the end off, pull a bit of cotton out and light.
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Use a straw to store 22 ammo.

The size of most fast food straws are a perfect fit for 22lr and 22wmr ammo.
Simply use the technique from the previous examples to seal your ammo and keep it away from moisture.
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Other ideas for drinking straws.

Store medication.
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First aid ointments.
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Salt, pepper, or spices.
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I'm sure you'll find many more uses for straws. I'd like to hear your ideas.

Stay tuned, I have a big do it yourself project coming real soon.

sasquatch
02-19-2018, 07:26 PM
The Rocket Stove is one of my favorite survival stoves. Because of the way it's designed, a little bit of fuel goes a long way, it produces enough heat to cook and boil water. These stoves will burn wood, paper, cardboard, fuel cubes, charcoal, pretty much any type of solid fuel. By having a split fuel chamber more air is drawn into the chamber causing the fuel to burn much hotter, forcing the heat produced up the chimney and focusing it on whatever cooking implement is over it.

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There are lots of advantages to using a rocket stove than an open fire pit.


Less fuel is needed
Less heat loss
Less ash is produced
Less environmental impact
Faster water boiling/cooking
Less chance of forest fires
Will burn regardless of wind or weather conditions
Less smoke
Small enough to be portable and not too hard to make, the rocket stove is an excellent survival tool, and great for camping also. In this article I'll show you step by step how to make one for yourself from common household objects.


Here's the materials you'll need:

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A #10 can and three smaller 28oz cans. Soak the cans in hot water and dish soap if needed to remove labels and glue.

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Be sure to keep the top to your #10 can.

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You'll need insulation for the inside of the stove, this material will stop heat loss from the sides of the stove. Common materials used are: sand, kitty litter, vermiculite, perlite, dirt, and clay. I'll be using kitty litter for this project, just regular, non-scented, clay kitty litter.

Now that you have the materials you'll need tools.

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For safety wear heavy gloves, the edges of the cut cans are dangerously sharp. Safety goggles should be worn also because of the danger of flying metal particles.
A Sharpie for marking cut lines.
Tin snips or a Dremel rotary tool for making the cuts.
A straight edge screwdriver for starting cut holes if you're using snips.
A hammer for punching holes with the screwdriver and flattening can.
A can opener.
A file for removing loose metal from cuts.
Pliers for straightening bent can edges.
Fireplace and Stove Mortar. (Optional) This isn't really needed, but it does help to seal up gaps making the stove more solid, more efficient and makes sure loose
insulation doesn't leak out. It's also good to have in case you have an oops moment and make the holes too large.
A wire hanger.



Alright, let's get this show on the road.

Step 1: Use the smaller can you intend to use for the side fuel/air chamber to mark cut lines on the #10 can.
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Step 2: Use screwdriver to make starter hole and cut out the hole. Use file to remove any loose metal spurs if needed.
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Step 3: Remove the bottom of intended side can.
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Step 4: Place the inner chimney can into the #10 can so it's centered inside. Insert the side can through, then mark where the top of the side can touches the chimney can.
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Step 5: Mark and cut the chimney can hole using the side can as a template. Test fit with chimney can. More trimming may be need to make it fit.
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Step 6: Insert side can through #10 can into chimney can.
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Step 7: Remove bottom of spare 28 oz can and flatten it by stepping on it, flatten more with hammer if needed.
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Step 8: Measure and mark flattened can so when cut it will fit into the middle of the side can. This will be your fuel shelf.
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(CONTINUED IN NEXT POST)

sasquatch
02-19-2018, 07:36 PM
(CONTINUED) PART 2

Snip the ends off of the tabs to separate the two halves of the flattened can making two single shelves. Keep the other half to use as a spare. The tabs on the end serve to stop the shelf from going in too far and are used for shelf removal. It should look like this:
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Step 9: Measure, mark, and cut slots in side can for shelf tabs.
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Step 10: Insert shelf into side can, bend tabs down. Using these tabs, the shelf can be removed for cleaning. Make sure to use a file to take down the sharp cut edges on the tabs to avoid cut fingers while removing.
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Step 11: (Optional) Apply mortar around side can where it enters the #10 and chimney can. Every gap you seal is going to increase the efficiency of your stove. Let mortar cure for at least 4 hours.
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Step 12: Fill with insulation to the rim of chimney can. Tap side of can to make sure every space is evenly filled.
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Step 13: Measure and mark spaces around #10 can rim. Approximately where the red lines are shown. Cut slots into the rim where marked, make sure cuts go down to the top of the insulation.
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Step 14: Bend down 4 opposite tabs to insulation. You can use a hammer if needed.
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Step 15: Cut center from #10 can top and place on top.
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Step 16: Bend down the other 4 opposite cut tabs over the lid to hold it in place.
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Step 17: (Optional) Use mortar to seal around chimney top. Don't seal the outside of the can lid though, only around the chimney top. This allows for any moisture or pressure that builds up to escape.
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Step 18: Drill opposing holes in the top and add a wire handle for easy carrying.
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Step 19: (Optional) Make your rocket stove look good and protected from rust by spray painting it with high temp stove paint.

Now you're done! Congratulations, you built your own rocket stove out of stuff that would be considered trash by most people. Feels good using your own two hands to make something useful doesn't it?

(CONTINUED IN NEXT POST)

sasquatch
02-19-2018, 07:42 PM
(CONTINUED) PART 3

Now that we've completed our Rocket Stove, Let's take it for a test burn.

Find a flat surface away from anything flammable.
Gather some tinder and fuel. You'll probably only need a handful.
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Load it up.
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Light it up, and watch it burn.
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There may be some smoke at first, this will be initial wood smoke, the linings of the cans or residue burning away.
All heat is directed straight to any cooking surface.
If insulated properly the outside should be cool or slightly warm to the touch.
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Try boiling a pot of water.
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You should be able to get a lot of use out of this stove, and if it ever wears out, you know how to make another one. These make great, inexpensive, gifts for that prepper, survivalist, or camper in your life. Using different colors of high heat paint you can decorate and personalize it.

Well, I hope you found this tutorial fun and informative.
I certainly had fun putting it all together.

If you liked it or have questions, leave a comment. I'd love to hear about different ideas or materials you've used and the results.

Thank you for reading. - Sasquatch

Stay tuned to GunNook for more do it yourself survival projects.

sasquatch
02-20-2018, 02:31 PM
Easy to make long burning, storm proof matches.
These matches will resist water, ignite, and burn in storm conditions.
Basically a fire starter and tinder all in one.

What you'll need:
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Strike anywhere wood matches
Paper towels
Paraffin wax




Step 1: Cut paper towel into strips and wrap around match stick below the match head.
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Step 2: Dip into melted wax, allow wax to coat head and absorb into the paper towel.
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Step 3: Remove match from wax. While wax is still soft, roll match between fingers to shape. Set aside to allow wax to solidify.
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Step 4: Store matches in original box. Strike as you would a normal match. (You may need to remove some wax from the match head to strike and ignite more easily.)



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As the match burns, the wax will melt and burn just like a candle wick. They will usually burn from 1-2 minutes.

Stay tuned for more projects.

sasquatch
02-21-2018, 03:32 PM
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This will look familiar to those that have seen my other post up there about building a rocket stove.

Well, I'm calling this one "Son of Rocket Stove".

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By miniturizing the design you can make a much smaller version that's even more portable.
This version can be stashed in a backpack, so it's a better option for survivalists, hikers, and campers. While it won't be as powerful as a full sized rocket stove, it is still very capable and will still boil water and cook food.

Here's the materials you'll need to build one.

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1x 4" diameter 28 oz can and it's removed top lid
3x 10.5 oz regular soup cans
Insulation (Kitty litter, sand, perlite, vermiculite, dirt)
Wire hanger
(Optional) Stove and fireplace mortar
(Optional) High heat stove paint





Here's the tools you'll need.
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For safety wear heavy gloves, the edges of the cut cans are dangerously sharp. Safety goggles should be worn also because of the danger of flying metal particles.
A Sharpie for marking cut lines.
Tin snips or a Dremel rotary tool for making the cuts.
A straight edge screwdriver for starting cut holes if you're using snips.
A hammer for punching holes with the screwdriver and flattening can.
A can opener.
A file for removing loose metal from cuts.
Pliers for straightening bent can edges.
Fireplace and Stove Mortar. (Optional) This isn't really needed, but it does help to seal up gaps making the stove more solid, more efficient and makes sure loose insulation doesn't leak out. It's also good to have in case you have an oops moment and make the holes too large.




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(CONTINUED IN NEXT POST)

sasquatch
02-21-2018, 03:48 PM
(Continued) Part 2

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Step 9: (Optional) Make your mini-rocket stove look good and protected from rust by spray painting it with high temp stove paint.

Step 10: (Optional) Add a small cast iron burner grate or round grill to put cookware on.


This stove functions just like the larger rocket stove so do a test burn the same as described in that tutorial.
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I ceratinly hope you enjoyed this tutorial and found it to be informative.
Let me know how you like it by leaving a comment. I'd love to hear from you and maybe see a picture of the rocket stove you built.

Thanks for reading. -Sasquatch

Stay tuned, there's more to come from the GunNook DIY Survival Project series.

sasquatch
02-22-2018, 04:04 PM
These are great waterproof fire starters and tinder in one package.

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To make your own, you'll need:
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Wooden strike anywhere matches
Corrugated cardboard
Paraffin wax
(Optional) Cotton or jute twine



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You can use a regular match striker to ignite, or use another source of ignition.
The one I made for this tutorial burned for 8 minutes, plenty of time to ignite even damp fuel. The twine wrapped version will burn longer.

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Thanks for reading and stay tuned for more GunNook do it yourself survival projects. - Sasquatch

sasquatch
02-26-2018, 04:15 PM
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With this simple do it yourself project you can forget having to pack messy bars or bottles of soap in your survival or camping kit.
Easy to make, once done, just add water and you have soap.

Here's what you'll need:
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Paper towels
Bowl or container
Microwave safe plate
Liquid dish soap or antibacterial hand soap. (I prefer concentrated dish soap since it's antibacterial and can be used for both hand and dish washing. This can be done with most body washes and shampoo also.)
Scissors





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sasquatch
02-27-2018, 08:24 PM
Here's another simple survival/camp stove you can make from common household items.


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It's called a Wood Gasifier Stove.

How does it work?
Well, unlike the Rocket Stoves I've built and shown before, a gasifier stove's fuel burns from the top down. The hot gasses from the burning fuel are sucked downward then directed back inside the stove between the inner and outer can where it burns from holes in the top. Once started, this process creates a very hot and virtually smokeless fire.

Alright, let's build one.




Here's the materials you'll need.
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1x: 40.5 oz 4" diameter can (This will be the main stove body.)
1x: 14.5 oz 3" diameter can (This will be the inner burn can.)
1x: 12.5 oz 4" diameter can (This will be used to make a collar for the top of the stove to set cookware on.)






Now for the tools you'll need.
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A can opener
Tin snips
Round file
3/16" drill bit
3/8" drill bit
Power Drill
Gloves
Stove mortar (Optional)
Stove paint (Optional)








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You're now done with the big can, set it aside.
Time to start on the inner burn can.

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That's it for the stove, now let's make the top collar.

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Time for a test burn.

Make sure you set the stove on a flat, non-flammable surface.
Gather some tinder and some pencil sized sticks.
Load the sticks into the stove and put the tinder on top, then light. As the sticks burn down you'll see that the top holes on the inside of the can ignite the gasses and burn steady.


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The opening in the collar will allow you to add more fuel as you're using it.
Obviously, this stove can become very hot on the outside, so don't attempt to touch or move it while in operation.
Larger and smaller versions of this stove can be made, just find the right sized steel cans.

This was a fun build, and I'm glad I get to share it with everyone.
I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. Leave a comment if you have any questions or suggestions, I'd love to hear from you.
Thanks for reading. Until next time. - Sasquatch

Stay tuned for more GunNook do it yourself survival projects.

sasquatch
03-03-2018, 09:18 PM
This homemade whistle is loud enough to wake the dead if made right.
Perfect for signaling for help if lost or scaring off predators.


Here's what you'll need to make one.
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A 223 Rem case
A knife
A chopstick or other similarly sized piece of round wood.
Super glue
Square needle file
Marker
C-clamp
Hacksaw
Needle nose pliers
Small diameter cord




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Now you'll need a way to channel the air flow, that's where the chopstick comes in.

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Now you're done. Give it a try.